News Letter – January 13

Dear Callies,

It might be well into the New Year but I think that I can still wish you all the very best for 2013. Here’s hoping that it will be healthy and prosperous for us all and that we will have happy times together.

Next Function

This will take the form of an intimate Valentines Dinner for senior members (just joking) all welcome!

Date…………………………………………………. 16th Feb 2013

Venue………………………………………………. 49Milner St (Bruce’s residence)

Time………………………………………………… 18.30 for 19.00

Cost…………………………………………………. R50

RSVP.. …………………………………………….. Mary 0538614980 or 0832312153 by 12th. (Leave message)

Please bring own drinks and glasses.

Birthdays

Pat Crossley………………………………………………….. 6/2

Dave Brown………………………………………………… 12/3

Joy McLeod…………………………………………………. 13/3

Round & About

  1. Ann looking much better after her surgery.
  2. Cathy Bell from Welkom recently underwent surgery for knee replacement.
  3. Dave & Sandy attended a function in Welkom to present John & Cathy Bell with honorary life membership from Federation.
  4. Pat Crossley staying at Hospice and her daughter Liz is visiting.
  5. Dave & Sandy off to Cape Town in March to attend the Cape gathering.
  6. Noreen in Mediclinic after surgery.

The Legend of St. Valentine

The history of Valentine’s Day–and the story of its patron saint–is shrouded in mystery. We do know that February has long been celebrated as a month of romance, and that St. Valentine’s Day, as we know it today, contains vestiges of both Christian and ancient Roman tradition. But who was Saint Valentine, and how did he become associated with this ancient rite? The Catholic Church recognizes at least three different saints named Valentine or Valentinus, all of whom were martyred. One legend contends that Valentine was a priest who served during the third century in Rome. When Emperor Claudius II decided that single men made better soldiers than those with wives and families, he outlawed marriage for young men. Valentine, realizing the injustice of the decree, defied Claudius and continued to perform marriages for young lovers in secret. When Valentine’s actions were discovered, Claudius ordered that he be put to death. Other stories suggest that Valentine may have been killed for attempting to help Christians escape harsh Roman prisons, where they were often beaten and tortured. According to one legend, an imprisoned Valentine actually sent the first “valentine” greeting himself after he fell in love with a young girl–possibly his jailor’s daughter–who visited him during his confinement. Before his death, it is alleged that he wrote her a letter signed “From your Valentine,” an expression that is still in use today. Although the truth behind the Valentine legends is murky, the stories all emphasize his appeal as a sympathetic, heroic and–most importantly–romantic figure. By the Middle Ages, perhaps thanks to this reputation, Valentine would become one of the most popular saints.

(Thanks to Google)

 Yours Aye,

 Mary